"Asked by a reporter at a recent news conference if the salvage workers were afraid that something would go wrong with the parbuckling, Sergio Girotto, project manager of Micoperi, replied: “We are simple people, we are engineers. Don’t ask us about feelings.”"

— Italy begins to lift capsized ship, WSJ, 9/16/13, http://on.wsj.com/14ZMVa8

theatlantic:

The Machine Zone: This Is Where You Go When You Just Can’t Stop Looking at Pictures on Facebook

"People love Facebook. They really love it," Biz Stone wrote earlier this month. “My mother-in-law looks hypnotized when she decides to put in some Facebook time.”
She is not the only one. ComScore estimates Facebook eats up 11 percent of all the time spent online in the United States. Its users have been known to spend an average of 400 minutes a month on the site.
I know the hypnosis, as I’m sure you do, too. You start clicking through photos of your friends of friends and next thing you know an hour has gone by. It’s oddly soothing, but unsatisfying. Once the spell is broken, I feel like I’ve just wasted a bunch of time. But while it’s happening, I’m caught inside the machine, a human animated GIF: I. Just. Cannot. Stop.
Or maybe it’ll come on when I’m scrolling through tweets at night before bed. I’m not even clicking the links or responding to people. I’m just scrolling down, or worse, pulling down with my thumb, reloading, reloading.
Or sometimes, I get caught in the melancholy of Tumblr’s infinite scroll.
Are these experiences, as Stone would have it, love? The tech world generally measures how much you like a service by how much time you spend on it. So a lot of time equals love. 
My own intuition is that this is not love. It’s something much more technologically specific that MIT anthropologist Natasha Schüll calls “the machine zone.”
Read more. [Image: Sarah Rich]

theatlantic:

The Machine Zone: This Is Where You Go When You Just Can’t Stop Looking at Pictures on Facebook

"People love Facebook. They really love it," Biz Stone wrote earlier this month. “My mother-in-law looks hypnotized when she decides to put in some Facebook time.”

She is not the only one. ComScore estimates Facebook eats up 11 percent of all the time spent online in the United States. Its users have been known to spend an average of 400 minutes a month on the site.

I know the hypnosis, as I’m sure you do, too. You start clicking through photos of your friends of friends and next thing you know an hour has gone by. It’s oddly soothing, but unsatisfying. Once the spell is broken, I feel like I’ve just wasted a bunch of time. But while it’s happening, I’m caught inside the machine, a human animated GIF: I. Just. Cannot. Stop.

Or maybe it’ll come on when I’m scrolling through tweets at night before bed. I’m not even clicking the links or responding to people. I’m just scrolling down, or worse, pulling down with my thumb, reloading, reloading.

Or sometimes, I get caught in the melancholy of Tumblr’s infinite scroll.

Are these experiences, as Stone would have it, love? The tech world generally measures how much you like a service by how much time you spend on it. So a lot of time equals love. 

My own intuition is that this is not love. It’s something much more technologically specific that MIT anthropologist Natasha Schüll calls “the machine zone.”

Read more. [Image: Sarah Rich]

(Source: drunkchan, via laugh-addict)

rhubarbes:

Dodge Pickup “Deora” (1965)

rhubarbes:

Dodge Pickup “Deora” (1965)

(via oldpunkguy)

lolsofunny:

jawshross:

Really bitch really

(lol here!)

lolsofunny:

jawshross:

Really bitch really

(lol here!)

(Source: joshr-ss, via laugh-addict)

tastefullyoffensive:

How dinosaurs happened. [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

How dinosaurs happened. [via]

npr:

(via America’s Oldest Sweet Shop Gets a Hipster Makeover | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine)

Ryan Berley and his 32-year-old brother, Eric, recently bought and restored Shane’s, the oldest continuously operated candy shop in America. The Philadelphia landmark, a couple of blocks from where in 1732 Benjamin Franklin printed the first Poor Richard’s Almanack, has been turning out sweets since 1863.

Photo: Chris Crisman/Smithsonian Magazine
Make sure you check out the other gorgeous photos of Shane’s. —heidi

npr:

(via America’s Oldest Sweet Shop Gets a Hipster Makeover | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine)

Ryan Berley and his 32-year-old brother, Eric, recently bought and restored Shane’s, the oldest continuously operated candy shop in America. The Philadelphia landmark, a couple of blocks from where in 1732 Benjamin Franklin printed the first Poor Richard’s Almanack, has been turning out sweets since 1863.

Photo: Chris Crisman/Smithsonian Magazine

Make sure you check out the other gorgeous photos of Shane’s. —heidi

beepbopboopbeepbop:

austinkleon:

A story of marriage, authenticity, and Taco Bell by @RobertMentzer

Hashtag Twitter Long form Non-fiction

beepbopboopbeepbop:

austinkleon:

A story of marriage, authenticity, and Taco Bell by @RobertMentzer

Hashtag Twitter Long form Non-fiction

youmightfindyourself:

brightwalldarkroom:

Wes Anderson’s original, black & white, 13 minute version of Bottle Rocket.

Anderson’s short film, which he shot in 1992 and distributed two years later, was originally set to star ”real” and established actors but, due to budget issues, the main roles were given to co-screenwriter Owen Wilson and his brother Luke, neither of whom had ever appeared in a film before.

Things worked out okay.

Two years later, with help from early Anderson fan and supporter, James L. Brooks, Bottle Rocket was reworked, reshot, and released as Wes Anderson’s first feature film.

—-

Related: A Speculative Wes Anderson Filmography (2014-2065)